10 Ways to Use Wildflowers in Witchcraft

use wildflowers in wicca

Freeze them in ice cubes.  Pluck flower heads and place them in an ice cube tray.  Fill the tray with water and freeze for some “summer energy” during the darker, colder winter rituals or to use when the flowers aren’t in season.

Leave a bouquet of wildflowers at the crossroads as an offering to the goddess Hecate when you are facing a difficult decision or major life change.

Make flower crowns for summer rituals.  Weaving flower crowns from local wildflowers you gathered by hand the morning of the event lends power and meaning to any ritual.  And you can make them any time of year.  I posted instructions for a winter version here, but the same basic technique applies.

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Make a blessing jar.  Get a vase or mason jar, place some meaningful gemstones in the bottom, fill with water and create wildflower arrangement that includes herbs & flowers chosen for their intent.  Place it near a window to bless your home, or give it away to a friend.

Plant them in your garden.  While many wildflowers tend to be invasive in the regions where they grow, that also makes them almost impossible to kill if your thumb isn’t so green.  Many produce seeds that can be gathered, but some you can just pull up by the root and transplant to a pot.

Add them to cupcakes for the Cakes & Ale portion of a ritual.  Hopefully, it goes without saying that you need to check to make sure the flowers are actually edible, and especially to make sure they aren’t poisonous.  Lots options exist within those boundaries.  For inspiration, check out this example of fairy cakes made with candied violets.

beltane faerie cakes

Press them in your Book of Shadows.  If you have a specific spell that requires a flower which grows seasonally in your area, gather a few during the growing season and press them into the pages where you wrote the spell.  That way, when you go to cast, your key ingredient remains conveniently nestled in the pages with it.

Mark the circle.  Go on a nature walk before your ritual and gather enough flowers to ring your casting circle.  This makes an  especially lovely bonding experience for coven rituals.

Create seasonal smudge wands.  Nothing adds a delicate touch to the ritual like fresh, local foliage.  If you know your local flowers and their associations, making smudge wands puts put that knowledge to use in visually pleasing way.  And if you don’t know your alchemic way around queen anne’s lace or black-eyed susans, you can always I’ll be happy to make one for you .  🙂

large floral smudgesmaller

Roll them into candles.  Gently heat a pillar candle in the oven until it’s just beginning to melt on the outside, then roll it on dried flowers.  Looks gorgeous on the altar.

Make salves and tonics to treat mild ailments.  If you’re well-versed in the medicinal or magical properties of your local herbs, take this time in the season to make a store of home remedies for cold & flu season.

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Litha Altar

IMG_0587Getting ready for my favorite Sabbat of the year.

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Oak leaves for the Oak King.  🙂

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Pretty cool chalice, huh?

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Wishing you and yours a happy Litha!

Blessed be.

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What’s New at Moody Moons?

Check out the latest handmade items from Moody Moons.  Click on the picture to go to the product page for a full description.

Get ready for Beltane!

Hand-rolled in herbs, flowers and oils chosen for their sacredness to the holiday of Beltane, this gorgeous pair of ritual candles makes an elegant edition to any Beltane altar or spring ritual.


Also available, Moody Moons signature Beltane incense is back in stock.

 

 

 

Introducing Moody Moons goddess line.

Gorgeous drop earrings with goddess pendants!  Perfect to wear for ritual, festivals, or every day adornment.

Fresh from the workshop!  Goddess candles.


And for all you early planners, Moody Moons already has Litha/Summer Solstice items in stock.  Get yours before they are gone.  Pre-order now and forget about it!

Summer Solstice Incense

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10 Ways to Celebrate Litha

10 ways to celebrate Litha

Make a batch of sun cakes.  If you’re a kitchen-y witch, celebrate this Sabbat by baking!  Sun cakes are perfect for the “cakes and ale” portion of a Litha ritual if you celebrate with a coven, or you can use them for offering.

Make herbal candle rings with your fresh herbs.   For the green witch:  with your herb garden in full swing, it’s time to make some creative use of it.

Try cloud scrying.   Find a warm, grassy spot and look up to see what messages the sky might have for you.

Go on an extended nature walk Pack a picnic or scout out a local natural swimming hole and dive fully into the Mother’s splendor.

Plan a camping trip.  If you’re feeling adventurous, pack up some gear and spend a night under the stars.

Attend a summer festival.  Litha is the week for pagan festivals.  Find one.  Attend it.  You’ll have a blast, I promise.

Go wildflower hunting.   Identify and harvest some wildflowers to use in your summer spell work.  Press them in your Book of Shadows if you have one.

Leave an offering of honey cakes outside.  Preferably somewhere away from your house, as they will attract insects and even wildlife.  Litha is said to be one of the two times of year when the “Veil Between Worlds” is the thinnest (the other being Samhain.)  According to legend, the fairies and forest spirits are especially active on the night of the summer solstice, and honey is favorite treat.

Speaking of honey, visit a honey farm!  If you’re not allergic to bees (or deathly afraid of them!) this is a nice activity.  Be sure to stock up while you’re there.

Read A Midsummer Night’s Dream.  Or better yet, go see a local production of it.  Full of traditional pagan folklore, Shakespeare’s classic comedy is one of my favorites and a common production for local theater companies this time of year.

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Litha at Moody Moons

Order now to cover all your Litha needs!

Click on the picture to view the product page.

Interested in Sun Magick?   This is the perfect time of year to try it and lucky for you, Moody Moons carries a gorgeous sun ritual kit.

sun magick altar kit

Check out Moody Moon’s Midsummer Oil, hand-blended with 100% organic essential oils and steeped in an olive oil base with Litha in mind.

midsummer oil

Long associated with the mythical world of woodland faeries, the Summer Solstice is said to be a time when delightful, mischievous spirits come out to play.

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It’s also a great time to work with dreams and meditation.

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That’s all for now!  Get ready for the longest day of the year and plan your ritual in style.

 

Summer Pagan Festivals: What to Bring (& What NOT to Bring)

Whether you’re packing for a day trip, or a hopping a plane across the world, there are few better ways to connect with your global pagan community than to participate in a summer festival.

To get you started on your journey, I’ve assembled a list of things to consider taking with you.  Welcome to: Packing Tips for Your Pagan Summer Festival

We’re assuming here that you have the basics of travel packing down. Hopefully, you haven’t reached this crossroads in life without knowing you need underwear, a toothbrush, clothing and your inhaler.

But there are a few things specific to pagan events that are nice to have along.

Here are six things to bring, and six to leave at home (or at least in the car!)

What to bring.

Tarot Cards. Even if you don’t read them fluently, at least 100 other people will. Tarot cards are a great way to get to know people, start conversations and generally break the ice.

A paper journal or Book of Shadows. Rediscover the lost art of handwritten journal entries.  Press flowers in them, take notes at workshops, draw whatever inspires you and write down spells and recipes you learn in your time there.

A lantern. The soft light of a lantern at night really warms up any outdoor space, encourages others to gather around you, and sets a lovely mood for spontaneous discussions.

A good bottle of red wine (and a corkscrew!). Here’s one heavier item that’s worth the weight! If you’re traveling from a far away land, bring something local from your home region to share during cakes and ale. Some people like to bring liquor because it’s less bulk, but I’m not a fan of the hard stuff. Red wine is usually served at room temp anyway, so there’s no need to keep it on ice, and you can drink it straight from the bottle like a hobo in a pinch. You will thank me for this.

A sturdy basket. I always bring a basket to carry around my random daytime stuff. You can use a backpack, but the baskets are so much more charming! Just make sure it’s high quality enough to withstand a beating. If you don’t have a good one, odds are there will be at least one artisan basket maker there, so treat yourself to a nice one.

A few of your most used tools. You can’t pack the whole sacred playground. Choose tools that are light, versatile and easy to carry.

Tea candles. Candles are infinitely useful at festivals or any pagan event. Our kind just can’t seem to function without them. But pillars and jar candles are bulky. Tea candles are lightweight. You can bring 50 without much trouble at all.

pagan packing tips

What NOT to bring.

Your smartphone and/or tablet. Just . . . leave it. If you really, absolutely must get online for some reason, someone else will have something you can borrow. You’re here to connect with nature. In our modern world, part of this is disconnecting from the internet. The experience of this alone is its own kind of vision quest. Be present.

Excessive makeup, jewelry and other fluffery. I’m not saying you can’t get all dolled up for the nightly bonfires. But you’ll appreciate the lighter load if you can at least pair down your usual repertoire. A good rule of thumb is to take half your usual cosmetics and toiletries. Simplify, simplify, simplify. Or, try the challenge of bringing only natural personal care items like essential oils, handmade soap and sea salt scrub.

More than one book. Trust me. You won’t read them. One is more than enough, and you probably won’t read that one, either. It’s just extra weight.

Your dieting rules. With all the walking and the physical activity, you’ll really appreciate why our ancestors didn’t have to watch their weight.

Your vice. Pick something. Anything. Then aim to go without it. Kind of like a mini New Year’s resolution.  It’s easier to give up almost anything with the change of scenery and all the other over-stimulation.

Your personal limitations. Take the opportunity to challenge yourself. Go to workshops about things way outside your comfort zone.

Better yet, teach one.

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Celebrate Litha: A Trip to the Lavender Fields

I thought it might be nice to complete our herb and wildflower theme this week by sharing with you our trip to the lavender farm.

Litha at the Lavender Fields

Those of you who have been around for a while know I’m a big fan of taking advantage of local farms. Earlier this year, I went with some friends to pick tulips for Beltane, and last year, we did sunflowers for Lammas.

It’s a wonderful way to stay connected to your community, learn about local plant species, pay homage to the cycling of the seasons and support independent farmers.

Summer Solstice

That said, I have a confession:  I did not actually need any lavender.

I have three of my own lavender plants, which are all thriving and should yield more than enough lavender for the coming year.

Litha Lavender

But it’s pretty hard to have too much of the stuff.  And the good folks at the flower farms are always full of helpful tips for cultivating beautiful flowers.  Not only do they know their specialty plants, they know specifically which varieties grow best in your region, what pests to watch out for and can answer your questions with the experience and knowledge of people who’ve been doing it professionally for years. Besides, the scenery alone was worth the drive.

Midsummer Outing

Plus, the gift shop was a tremendous inspiration for lavender crafting.  Who this lovely little plant was so versatile?  Check out some ideas for how to get the most of your bundles.  Lavender goes way beyond sachets for the drawer!

-Candle makers can make a simple, elegant, lightly scented pillar by adding handful of lavender petals to a white pillar.

-Lavender is edible.  There are loads of recipes for cookies, cakes and icing that include lavender.

-Make smudge sticks from lavender.  No, seriously, they smell amazing, and you can keep them all year.

-Lavender can be brewed into tea.  Have it by itself, or mix it with chamomile and mint for a light, dreaming blend.

Add lavender to a muslin bag and drop it in your bathwater for a soothing bedtime ritual. Enjoy!

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