Harvest Moon Esbat Cakes

My new favorite kitchen tool:  the mini muffin tin.  I rarely want or need a full size cake or even a cupcake for Cakes & Ale.  Enter the mini muffin tin.  A perfect size for making ritual cakes, I constantly find new and creative ways to honor the seasons of the moon using this simple device.  This month?

harvest moon cakes 5

I usually provide a link to the recipe and focus on the ritual meaning of ingredients in my kitchen witch posts.  But one came about of my own experimentation and tinkering, so I’ll dish (I know, I’m full of cheesy kitchen jokes this time of year).

The Harvest Moon and the fall season in general signify a time to acknowledge our deceased loved ones’ memories (especially those who have passed on during the last year), give thanks for the abundance of the harvest and enjoy the company of those we hold most dear.

The baking process fills your space with the scent and spirit of the autumn season.

Sharing harvest moon cakes with a coven, friends or family solidifies bonds and honors our relationships with our communities.

Make your ritual cakes for the Cakes & Ale portion of your moon ritual to lend power to your spell work.  The focus and concentration of choosing ingredients especially for the occasion raises the vibrations in your home.

This recipe makes 24 mini cakes, but you can half it pretty easily.

1 cup white sugar
1/2 cup butter (softened)
2 eggs
2 teaspoons vanilla extrac
t
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 3/4 teaspoons baking powder 1/2 cup milk

Any combination of the following (I just eyeballed it):

*A whole bunch of ground ginger
*A whole bunch of ground cinnamon
*A whole bunch of ground allspice
*A little less ground nutmeg

For the frosting:

1/2 cup butter (softened)
8 oz.  cream cheese (softened)
4 cups confectioner’s sugar
splash of vanilla

1.  Preheat oven to 300 degrees.

2.  Sift together flour, baking powder and ground spices.

3.  Blend butter and sugar.

4.  Combine dry ingredients and add eggs and vanilla extract.

5.  Grease your muffin tin(s) well or use cupcake liners.

6.  Spoon mixture into tins and bake for 10 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean.

7.  While the cakes are baking, combine cream cheese, butter, confectioner’s sugar and vanilla extract to make frosting.

8.  Allow cakes to cool for at least 30 minutes before icing them.

9.  Optional:  garnish with soft-bake ginger snap cookies.

Enjoy at your harvest moon ritual or leave some on the altar as an offering.  They freeze well, so you can bake a big batch and use them throughout the fall during the Esbat.

harvest moon cakes 2

All the spices included in these cakes are traditional to the harvest season in the Wiccan religion, as well as many neopagan traditions in general.  Cinnamon in particular has many spiritual properties.

harvest moon cakes 1

harvest moon cakes 3

If you like this recipe, you may also enjoy this post about yule cookies, in which I go into more detail about the meaning of the harvest season ingredients.

Feel free to leave your own harvest moon recipes in the comments or share your experience with this one!

Blessed full moon!

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20 Experiences to Add to Your Witchy Bucket List

I love bucket lists.  Who doesn’t?  They inspire us to dream bigger, travel more, try new things and imagine all the possibilities.

But what about our spiritual lives?  What lies ahead in our path remains a mystery, but if you could make a few roadside stops, where would they be?

Sometimes called “The Witch’s New Year,” Samhain marks the beginning of a new cycle of the Wheel of the Year.  Celebrate by setting new goals for yourself!

designing your witchy bucket lsit

Try this: sit down with a pen and paper (yes, a real pen and some real paper), set a timer for 15 minutes and brainstorm all the things you would do in your pagan life if your resources and time were unlimited.

Here are 20 ideas to get you started.  As I do them (or have done them), I will leave a link to a post about the experience.

Start a mind/body workout regimen.   In a couple of months, everyone begins the predictable process of making resolute, well-intentioned New Year’s resolutions to be more fit and lose weight.  Rather than joining the (sometimes unhealthy) crowds in a crash diet stampede to the local gym, consider taking a more spiritual workout approach.

Participate in a paranormal investigation.  No matter what they say in public, most people feel something a little compelling about ghost chasing.  With the veil between worlds at its thinnest, the time before and after Samhain presents an amazing opportunity to try this out!

Visit Salem, Massachusetts.  Contrary to popular belief, no witches every actually stood trial or were put to death in Salem.  The victims of the Salem Witch Trials were very likely Christians accused of witchcraft falsely by their community.  However, this hasn’t stopped the pagan/Wiccan/modern witchcraft culture from making the trip to Salem a kind of unofficial pilgrimage.  Salem embraces this designation, especially during the month of October, when the many occult shops and practitioners put on events. 

Discover your pagan roots.  Everyone alive today in the world carries the genes of pagan ancestors.  Whether you people hail from Ireland or Botswana, discover and learn about where you came from for deeper meaning in your practice.  (I recently got my DNA tested and found out I descend partly from India and partly from Romania—-both historical and current pagan cultures that interested me greatly from the beginning.)

Create a mini shrine.  Already committed to a pagan path?  Express yourself creatively by designing a mini shrine that suites your specific approach to the Craft.

Get to know your tarot deck.   Refuse to let your tarot deck intimidate you anymore!  Break away from your dependency on the little booklet that came with your deck and become fluent in the language of tarot.

Gather fresh flowers for every Sabbat.  Nothing brings the spirit of the season into your home like a fresh bouquet of local herbs and flowers.  Be creative!  An arrangement of pinecones or winter vegetables makes a lovely centerpiece during the less garden-y months.

Try a weekly nature walk.  If you spend more time in front of a screen than surrounded by green, take some time out for yourself and commune with nature.  The effect of fresh air and the time spent un-cluttering your busy mind refreshes even the most frazzled witch.

Read every book on this list.   Or feel free to compile your own! Amazon lets you create lists if you constantly come across books you mean to read but never get around to.  It helps to refer to one for those trips to the library or when your friends/family start asking what you want for yule.

Celebrate every full moon for one year.  We all skip Esbats occasionally, but committing to a full year of planning them out and following through cultivates self-discipline, lending to power to you magick.

Visit New OrleansFamed for its rich spiritual traditons (like hoodoo and voodoo) and swarming with ghost stories, a stay in New Orleans enriches any pagan’s bucket list!

Try fasting for spiritual insight.  Fasting gifted me one of my more interesting spiritual experiences this past year.

Learn to write your own spells.  I promise, I plan to write a post about this eventually.  Learning to write your own spells puts the power (and responsibility) of your magick in your hands—-exactly where it belongs.

Write down your dreams every night for a full moon cycle.   It’ll blow your mind.  You very likely experience reoccurring themes in your dreams that play out completely subconsciously.  Bringing them to the surface with a dream journal provides special insight into both your dreamning and waking life.

Do something special for the Blue MoonIt’s coming up on January 31st, 2018.

Take a belly dance class.  If you’re looking to discover your inner goddess this turn of the Wheel of the Year, a belly dance class makes the ideal introduction.  Explore your femininity, celebrate your mystique and draw out your unique allure.

Go to a lantern festival.   I haven’t yet done this, but it looks amazing!

Experiment with dark moon divination We tend to place a lot of emphasis on the full moon in witchcraft, but the dark moon calls to our sense of mystery and intuition.  Try a new form of divination this Wheel and commit to practicing every month during this sensitive period.

Commit to living closer to the earth.    All of us can do better.  And little changes make a big difference.  No need to go crazy, just pick one or two new habits to work on at a time.  Then notice the little ways Gaia thanks you for your contribution to protecting the natural world we love so much.

Learn to live with less.  If it’s been a while since you’ve de-cluttered, experiencing the spiritual rejuvenation of weeding out unnecessary clutter.  You’ll literally breath easier.  I promise.

10 Ways to Use Lapis Lazuli in Witchcraft

Tranquil, soothing and beautiful, lapis lazuli’s timeless mystical appeal drew the admiration of ancient royalty.  Today, practitioners of crystal magick use it in a variety of ways.  Want to try it?  Here are a few simple, creative and inspiring ideas to incorporate this unique stone into your spell work and rituals.

In honor of Moody Moon’s new Bling Blessings jewelry line, this post begins a series on the in-depth properties of common gemstones and crystals.

If this subject interests you, be sure to check out my article, 10 Ways to Use Clear Quartz.

10 ways to use lapis lazuli in witchcraft

Hold a piece to sooth stress or anxiety.  People struggling with mild anxiety sometimes feel relief when holding a piece of lapis lazuli.

Place it near the hearth of the home to harmonize disrupted relationships.  Kids bickering?  Are you and your partner inexplicably annoying each other lately?  Try a piece of lapis lazuli near the heart of the home (living room, kitchen, wherever everyone spends the most time together in the house) to help quiet tempers and promote cooperation.

Use during dark moon divination to symbolize the night sky.  With its dark blue color and tiny, flashing golden flecks of pyrite, lapis lazuli resembles a star-filled, moonless horizon.  Keep a piece near during your dark moon divinations to draw in the energy of the darkest nights of the month.

Place a piece on an Egyptian altar.  If you honor the Egyptian Pantheon in your practice, place a piece of lapis lazuli on your altar to draw out your “inner queen.”  Egyptian pharaohs ground the gemstone into an deep-indigo powder for use as eye shadow or to dye clothing.  Its brilliant hue symbolized royalty and power.

Place it in mojo bags for inner peace.   Include lapis lazuli in inner peace mojo bags for its wonderfully calming properties.   Let it smooth out frayed nerves and quiet the rough tides of your spirit.

Bring it with you into deceptive situations.  If you suspect dishonesty afoot, carry a piece of lapis lazuli to encourage the truth to service.  But take caution!  Expect it to unmask your own deceptions, too!  Especially the ones you tell yourself.

Toss one in the cauldron for tranquility and reconciliation brews.   
Lapis Lazuli’s tendency to encourage people to empathize with their partners, family members and friends deeply allows them to see past their personal frustrations and misunderstandings, clearing obstacles that stand in the way of healthier interpersonal connections.

Carry it to sooth stage fright.  If speaking in public makes you nervous, carry a piece to calm your nerves and center your emotions before presentations and performances.

Wear it during meditation to open the third eye.  Lapis lazuli’s chakra correspondence rests on the Third Eye, a both literal and figurative place in the body between and slightly above your eyebrows.  The third eye “sees” the invisible and informs your intuitive senses.

Give it as a gift.  This gemstone blesses deep friendships.  Give it to a new or old friend in raw form or set into jewelry.

Sources:

Crystal Vaults

Balance Chakra

11 Fall Projects for the Crafty Witch

11 fall craft ideas for the pagan witch.jpg

As cozy bonfires begin to flare and the first pumpkins appear at the farmer’s market, all the rich, colorful warmth of the autumn season approaches, electrifying even the seasoned witch with anticipation for the coming months.

For winter project ideas, take a look at 10 Winter Crafts for Wiccans.

For spring project ideas, check out 10 Spring Craft Projects for Wiccans.

1.  Design and sew your own voodoo doll or poppet.  If you’re a sewing whiz, you can modify a pattern for a regular stuffed doll to make it all creepy.  Or, just kind of wing it.  That’s what I did with this one, which came together from a mishmash of sewing scraps.  The best part is that it doesn’t need to be perfect.  Odd, asymmetrical limbs, “sloppy” stitches and mismatched button eyes add to the effect.

voodoo doll.jpg

2.  Use your kitchen scraps and spices to craft the perfect fall incense blend.  Make creative use of orange peels, fall spices like cinnamon & star anise, or pine needles collected on an autumn walk.  Blend your own fall incense for use during Mabon & Samhain rituals, or to celebrate the harvest moons.

mabon incense

3.   Create a scrap book for you ancestors.  Samhain reminds us to remember those who came before us.  Honor them in the coming months by researching their lives, gathering pictures from relatives and putting together a “family history” album.  Bonus:  When you’re done, it makes a great Yule gift.

4.  Make your own scrying mirror.   I love projects that make use of odds and ends.  Who doesn’t have an old picture frame?Use it to make your own scrying mirror.  It’s easy. fun and opens up a new “window” to explore divination and fortune telling.  As the days grow shorter, the “veil between worlds” thins, making this the perfect time to peer into otherworldly affairs.

scrying mirror

5.  Make black salt.  As the days begin to wane, autumn makes the ideal time to make ingredients for protection and binding spells.  Make a batch of black salt from your fire pit ashes to store for this type of ritual.

6.  Decorate a mask for Samhain.  Whether you have big plans for a Samhain party or you’re just answering the door to pass out treats, decorating a mask is an easy way to get in the spirit of the season.  Blank masks are available at craft stores and online.  They come in a variety of styles and the creative possibilities are endless!

mask

7.  Adorn a pillar candle with fall leaves for the perfect Mabon altar.    Choose a white candle of the appropriate size (large for large altar, tiny for a small one.)  Gently melt a thin layer of wax in the bottom of a frying pan or large pot.  Roll the candle in the wax, then press beautiful leaves into the surface for a gorgeous, natural altar piece.

Fall Leaf

10.  Glam out a pumpkin.  Forget the same, tired pumpkin carving party.  Go glam.  Spray paint your pumpkin gold or black, glue rhinestones on it, cover it in glitter, adorn it with old costume jewelry or do what I did one year, and slip half a pair of lacy stockings over it.

11.  Blend your own Samhain oil.  If you have a drawer or box full of essential oils you never get around to using, try making your own samhain oil from earthy, autumn-inspiring oils like cinnamon, nutmeg, orange oil or patchouli.  Or, if essential oils aren’t your thing, try steeping orange peels and cinnamon sticks at a low temperature in olive oil until you get something you like.  (Or you can always let me make some for you!)  Be sure to pick out a lovely glass bottle from the thrift store and adorn it with ribbon or charms if you like.

samhain oil

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25 Ways to Honor the Full Moon

25 ways to honor the full moon

Do you always mean to do something for the full moon, but it passes you by unrecognized?  Or you do celebrate, but you’re tired of the same old “full moon chores”?  The following list of 25 Ways to Honor & Connect with the Full Moon includes some fresh, inspiring ideas to energize your creativity and zap the life back into your Esbat experience.

Set your intention for the month.  A full moon cycle is plenty of time to take your whole life in another direction!   Set your goal the night of the full moon.  As the moon wanes, clear away obstacles that stand between you and success, and as it waxes, focus on nurturing your efforts until they bear fruition.

Try dream magick.   If you’ve never dropped down the rabbit hole of dream magick, doooooo it!  Experiment with dream work by trying this personal experiment with your dreams, which you may begin either during the dark moon and continue to the full moon or begin on the full moon and continue to the next full moon for a full cycle of warping your dream/waking life.  You will have insights—guaranteed.

Gather graveyard dirt—if you dare.   An experience a teen witch might appreciate.  At my age, being caught in a graveyard in the middle of the night would definitely solidify my already emerging neighborhood reputation for eccentricity.  But if you’re a kid, it can be fun.  Even the most grounded among us feels a little jolt of adrenaline at the thought of wandering into a cemetery at night..  Gathering dirt under the moon in this mood charges it with the power of your bravery.

Go out for Cakes & Ale.  Instead of holding cakes and ale at the ritual site, go out to a pub or brewery.  We went to a German restaurant for cakes & ale once, it was fabulous!

Make a batch of moon water.  Versatile and infinitely useful in ritual, I try to keep a supply of moon water in my cabinet of supplies.  I frequently scold myself for forgetting when I run low and letting the esbat pass, but the full moon makes the best opportunity to craft a bottle.

Boil your cauldron.  Put a large pot on the stove, fill with water and bring to boil.  Add any combination of the following dried herbs: mugwort, wormwood, lavender, cinnamon, peppermint, chamomile.  Let your potion boil for 30 minutes to bless home or clear old energies.

Rework your altar.  If you have a working altar, it very likely needs a clean sweep at least once a month.  The full moon makes an ideal time to spruce up the mojo.  Wipe off incense ashes, polish your stones and smudge.  Or, go for a total makeover.  Paint the table or shelf where your altar sits or finally bust out your compass app to figure out once and for all which way north is.

Make a spell box.  A spell box is exactly what it sounds like.  Choose a box, simple or beautiful, and fill it with your spell ingredients.  Bless and leave on the altar for a full moon cycle.  This scavenger hunt spell box makes a great, easy-to-customize box spell.

Take a ritual bath.  Draw a hot bath, turn out the lights and use candles.  Add natural bath salts, essential oil and/or a muslin bag of herbs to the bath water.  Soak and use the time to meditate quietly or bless yourself.

Make moon cakes.  If you’re “kitchen oriented,” the internet abounds with recipes for moon cakes.  This one is especially lovely, and makes an elegant evening project—with your kitchen window open to the full moon, of course.

Try fasting.  If you’re in good health and you’ve never tried fasting for spiritual reasons, it’s an amazing experience for many people. +

Begin a long fast on the full moon, or simply do a 24-hour fast to honor the Esbat or in place of an offering.

Smoke out your house.  Using smudge or loose incense in a fire-safe dish, burn herbs and blow the smoke into all the corners and around the doors and windows.  Be sure to pay special attention to rooms where family arguments happened over the last month, as well as the bedrooms of anyone who was sick.

Bond with your familiars.  Animals tend to be connected their most primal energies during the full moon.  Pay careful attention for a glance through that window into their souls.

Practice yoga under the moonlight.  Sublimely calming, moonlit yoga soothes frayed nerves and invites quiet contemplation.  This article on how to make your mind/body practice more spiritual lists some ideas to get you in the mood.

Go for the skyclad experience.   If this is your thing, by all means, have at it while the weather’s warm.  I’m told it’s “the only way to fly.”

Try the Free Will of Fate tarot spread.  Wondering where the next month is going?  Try this tarot spread for insight into where you’re headed and how to navigate the road in front of you.

Write a list of regrets and burn it.  Don’t dismiss the power of this simple ritual.  We often torment ourselves with what we should have/could have/would have done instead.  But mistakes are essential to the learning process.  Without mistakes, there can be no progress.  If the heaviness of regret weighs you down, write it on paper.  Be brutal.  Write down all the cruel things you say to yourself and then really reflect on them.  Ask yourself if you’d talk to another person the way you talk to yourself.  If the answer is no, set that bad boy on fire and let the smoke carry away your grief.  Promise to leave it in the goddess’ hands and walk away without looking back—-literally.

Harvest herbs.  The full moon makes the best time to go looking for ritual herbs.  Even if you don’t tend a garden and it’s the dead of winter, there’s almost always something available in the wastelands around you to snatch up.  In the coldest climates, evergreens and hardwoods harvest year-round, and many other climates have a 12-month growing season.

Open a bottle of wine.  If you like wine, the full moon offers you a lovely excuse to pop a cork.  Make it magical by pairing your wine appropriately with the ritual and season.

Find a public ritual.  Many occult shops, local pagan groups and Unitarian Universalist churches offer public moon rituals that welcome anyone who wants to attend.  Particularly if you are new to paganism, these events provide a wonderful local resource to learn and grow.

Have a moonlit picnic.  While I don’t recommend public parks at night, even a candlelit meal on your balcony sets a beautiful mood.  Share with a like-minded friend and consider setting aside a portion of the meal as an offering if you’re tradition calls for it.

Host a “moon dance” for the kids.  Is everyone in your coven struggling through the Mother phase and hard up for babysitters when the full moon rolls around?  Tell them to bring the kids!  I always struggle to think of ways for children to participate that aren’t overly formal or serious, and a moon dance is neither!  All you need is a backyard or (even better) a safely fenced-in rooftop terrace.  Encourage everyone to bring percussion instruments or just load your phone with esbat-friendly music.   

Visit or call a friend in need.  Odds are, you know someone who needs you.  Maybe your neighbor raising three kids on her own will let you watch the little ones while she takes her first hot bath in a decade.  Maybe your grandmother hasn’t had anyone besides solicitors ring her doorbell in weeks.  Or, maybe you have wicked math skillz to teach a disadvantaged child at your local youth center.  Absolutely nothing on this list will make you feel better than doing something for someone else, which is the essence of spiritual gratitude.  Give yourself the gift of giving.

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Natural Living for Pagans: 10 Ways to Live Closer to the Earth

Oh, pagans.  I love my people.  I really do.  Adorned in flowery skirts, tattooed with woad or dripping with crystals, my sisters and brothers in the Craft really do live life according to their own rules.  But there’s one thing we all agree on:

Nature is cool, man.

If nothing else, we like us some trees.  We sleep in the trees.  We put parts of trees in our tea.  We even have workshops . . . about trees.

How many of us have gone to a class at one of the local occult boutique, or been to a workshop at one of the festivals that brighten summer, to listen to a self-appointed magickal guru wax poetically about the virtues of “living in harmony with nature” and “connecting with the earth daily.”

Everyone nods, smiles, and we all vow to do just that.

And then you look down.  And in your hand, you find yourself holding a very unnaturally orange bag of Cheetos, which you plan to wash down with your tasty Mountain Dew and then drive home in a camper that’s about as fuel efficient as an oil rig.

I’ve done it.  I continue to do it.  Daily, even,  I note what might politely be called “ironies” and less politely call “hypocrisies,” or at the very least, inconsistent practice of my own belief system.

Some of it can’t be avoided.  We can’t all pitch organic canvas tents on a mountain top in the middle of the Blue Ridge and “live off the land” our whole lives.

But even suburban or urban life offers many opportunities to live closer to the earth, eliminate wasteful habits and bring about a healthier, more globally conscious lifestyle.

natural living for the natural witch

Start composting.  Even if you don’t garden or you live in the city.  This simple act of reverence for the earth and its resources makes a lovely daily devotional.  It may seem insignificant at first, but over weeks and months, you begin to see how much waste you produce, and how much of it may be returned to the earth instead of a landfill.  Try dedicating your compost pile to a spell or personal cause and think of your deposits as offerings.

Try cloth menstrual care.   Everyone knows someone who does the cloth pads.  She’s always one of those wild sisters who swears it’s this whole primal experience.  I don’t know about all that, but cloth tampons and pads produce less waste, force you to unapologetically confront your hang-ups about the realities of womanhood and are way cheaper in the long run.  Plus they come in lots of cute colors and styles.  If you cloth diapered your little ones, this will be a piece of cake.

Donate.  Simplify your living space by donating all that stuff you think you need but don’t.  Let go of any unnecessary objects, especially electronics and devices that encourage mindless time-wasting and keep you indoors.  If you want to ritualize the experience, try donating an appropriate object as an offering to the universe.  For example, give your largest pair of jeans to Goodwill to boost a weight-loss spell.

Gather your own firewood.  I don’t know if you noticed, but that stuff is expensive even at Walmart.  And buying firewood cheats you of the experience of collecting it yourself.  If you have a hearth in your home or even just a backyard fire pit, take a walk in the woods and collect it yourself before your next Sabbat or Esbat get-together.  Better yet, invite some help.  This activity makes a romantic walk in the woods or a fun, screen-free after-dinner walk with the kids depending on your mood.

Get to know your local wildlife.  Your unique geographic location offers a wealth of resources for any herbalist.  The freshest, and often most potent plants for the herbalist or metaphysical practitioner are not in a fancy organic supplier’s catalog or the health food store—it’s in your backyard.  Or growing between the cracks in the sidewalk, or vining its way up the side of the abandoned building near the railroad tracks.  Photograph random plants with your phone, and identify them for their medicinal or metaphysical properties.  Even knowing 10 local herbs and where to find them is a very valuable skill.

Switch to cloth shopping bags.  You very likely already have some stuffed in a drawer or under your sink.  You just never use them.  Use them.  And don’t worry that you won’t have plastic bags to line your waste baskets.  Even if you use cloth all the time, you will inevitably still manage to accumulate plastic bags everywhere.  That’s a monster you can’t kill.  Just aim to tame it.

Stop using harsh chemical cleaners.  Not only are they totally unnecessary, they often make things worse, inviting antibiotic resistant bacteria into your life and exposing your pets and family to harsh commercial compounds.  Make it magical by using appropriate protection herbs, cleansing essential oils and natural air fresheners to “enchant” your house with homemade cleaning “potions.”

Make natural eating a slow, but steady course.  If you’re like me (or any one of the millions of Americans on crazy diets), you very likely have, at least once in your life (usually in January), cleared all the junk food out of your house and gone on some kind of militant health craze that you know is doomed to fail even as you are doing it.  Slow, steady progress to natural eating is much more sustainable.  Set small goals, like going to the farmer’s market once a week or planning at least a couple of “whole food” meals per week.  Or just try cutting out soda and replace it with sparkling water and lemon.  Once you’ve stayed consistent for a few months, try eliminating or adding something else to your rotation.  After a while, natural eating becomes instinctive.

Consider a more fuel-efficient car and/or drive way less.  Do you drive even very short distances just because that’s your habit?  Don’t miss the chance to be outdoors and out of the rat race.  Can you bike to the grocery store?  Find a Zumba class or a coffee house within walking distance?  Even if you can find one chore or regular activity to walk or bike to every week, your health and mental well-being stand to benefit by leaps and bounds.  And the next time you make a car purchase, chose fuel efficiency as a top priority—even if it means driving a yellow car with an unfortunate legacy of decals from the previous owner.

Speaking of which, buy used.  Take advantage of sites like Craigslist, Freecycle and Facebook trading groups to enjoy the financial and environmental benefits of second-hand stuff.  Many times, you can get what you need for free or next-to-nothing.  While some things (like bathing suits and underwear—-ick) are worth getting new, many things (like sturdy cookware, wood furniture and toys) cost so much less second hand.  Buying used also tends to keep usable things out of landfills, puts money back into the local economy and reduces production of greenhouse gases.

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Moody Moons Now Offering Wholesale

So excited to announce that the following handmade items will be available for wholesale!

Click on the photo to be taken to a full product description.  Prices in the listing are for individual sale.

Please message me for wholesale discounts on quantities of 10 or more at:

magicalmoodymoons@gmail.com

First up, Moody Moon’s brand new Rose & Cinnamon Cedar Smudge.

This cedar smudge wand was wildcrafted and hand-rolled with natural twine, rose buds, local Virginia Juniper and cinnamon sticks.

Virginia Juniper is traditionally used in native US tribes and is growing in popularity with the pagan, wiccan and witchcraft communities.

Juniper is more than sustainable—-it’s actually an invasive species in Northern Virginia, so harvesting it in the wild helps tame the tide.

This gorgeous smudge wand was handmade with love using rose, organic essential oils and wildcrafted juniper berries and evergreens.

Best of all, it smells amazing!

Smudge is approximately 8″ and rolled fat!

Ritual Black Salts

Made with authentic, 100% natural ingredients, black salt is sacred in the hoodoo and voodoo traditional.

This hand-ground black salt contains the fire ash of cedar and oak trees on the historic, notoriously haunted Manassas Battlefields.

Sustainably gathered under the dark moon and combined with natural sea salts.

Coarsely ground carbon chunks throughout. Beautiful stuff.

PLEASE DO NOT EAT BLACK SALT–This item is not for culinary use.

Jar is approximately 3″ x 1″ diameter.

Hekate Incense

Hand-blended incense crafted with natural spices, resins and 100% organic essential oils chosen for their sacredness to Hecate.

Warm and spicy, this gorgeous blend will fill your sacred space with the alluring scent of ancient divinity.

Often symbolized by her association with witchcraft, herbal mastery, ghostly spirits, and the threshold between worlds, Hekate (or “Hecate”) is a goddess of magic and otherworldly matters.

Hekate has been noted for her many cultural parallels, including the Egyptian goddess, Isis.

For many, she embodies the Triple Goddess aspect of Wicca.

Jar approximately 2.5″ x 2.5″

Mabon Incense

Both fragrant and beautiful, this spicy, exotic-smelling Mabon incense calls to mind the essence of the early autumn.

Burn during ritual or simply to fill your house with the scent of the fall festival season.

Jar is approximately 2″ x 2″

 

Harvest Smudge

This artisan quality, handmade smudge stick is rolled with herbs, resins, oils and barks sacred to the harvest festivals Lammas, Mabon & Samhain.

As the copper colors of the late summer and early Fall sun begin to cool, it is time to turn our attention to the splendors of the harvest season.

Include this gorgeous, detailed smudge stick in your harvest rituals this year to add a touch of elegance.

Lovely for use in autumn handfastings or baby showers as well. Smells amazing!

Bound with 100% natural twine.

This giant 13″ smudge stick is perfect for group rituals, outdoor rituals and even handfasting ceremonies.

Anointed with 100% organic essential oils chosen for their ritual potency.

Made of Eastern Red Cedar (sometimes called “Virginia Juniper”), this herb is still used in authentic Native American ceremonies today in tribes all over the north east.

The wood from Eastern Red Cedar was also used by native tribes to mark hunting territories and is the origin of the name Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Store this in your closet—as an added bonus, it repels moths!


This huge, artisan quality, handmade floral smudge stick weaves local wildflowers with Eastern Red Cedar and 100% pure, organic essential oils.

A stunning addition to any handfasting ceremony, wiccan baby shower, Sabbat or spring/summer ritual.

About 12”.

Please note: Because this smudge is crafted locally, flowers vary according to season.

This item ships FREE.

More wholesale items will be offered soon!  As always, if you have a wholesale request, please message me or leave it in the comments.

Blessed Be!

 

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