20 Common Household Items Used in Witchcraft

Beginning Witchcraft Tools

Check out these common household items used in witchcraft for some creative ways to make the most of what you already have!

In a society obsessed with mass consumption, it can be tempting to allow a shopping habit to carry over into your spiritual life.

While I certainly encourage you to treat yourself occasionally to a new tarot deck or an exotic ritual herb from the apothecary shop, I firmly believe in working with what you have first!

If you’re in the broom closet, everyday items offer an incognito alternative to more obvious tools of the Craft.

And even if you’re not, using what you have forces you to come up with creative ideas, which always make the best building blocks for a solid spell.

If you like this article, it’s especially useful to pair it with How to Write Your Own Magick Spells.

Common Household Items Used in Witchcraft

Blank Book

If you have a pretty blank book laying around (I always do!), consider creating your own Book of Shadows or grimoire.  It’s rewarding and something you can pass on to your children or younger coven members.

Broom

This classic magical tool lurks in a dark corner somewhere in nearly every household in the world.  Use your broom to ritually “sweep” your sacred circle.  If you have a spare, you can decorate the handle with carvings or wrap it in ribbon and dedicate it your practice.

Candles

Choose one with a color or scent that corresponds to your purpose and incorporate it into a spell or ritual.

Cast Iron Pot

Can be used in place of a ritual cauldron.  Sometimes, it’s even better than the kind you find for witchcraft, because kitchen cauldrons are food safe.  Definitely a must-have for any kitchen witch.  Boil aromatic herb blends to bless the house with a particular energy (lavender for calming, rosemary for protection, sage to stop arguments, etc).

Fabric Scraps

So many possibilities!  Use a large piece as an altar cloth or (if you have the skills) make a ritual robe out of it.  Smaller scraps can be made into spell sachets or mojo bags.

Glass Bottles & Jars

While many herbs (and even oils) come in plastic bottles and bags, plastic makes a very low-quality storage option.  Use leftover jars from peanut butter, jelly, preserves, and sauces to store your ritual herbs and oils.

Glitter

This super common craft supply adds a magical touch to any spell.  Check out this Sun Spell to Banish Depression for a beautiful example.

Pen/Paper

Try this traditional banishing spell:  write down something you want out of your life, like a person, thing, habit or even the place you live.  Burn it outside and visualize releasing it into the sky.

Knife

Any kitchen knife can be used as a ritual knife.  You don’t need anything fancy.

Use it to “cut” a passage in your sacred circle, harvest herbs and carve ritual candles.

Lanterns

Nothing brings magic to life like lanterns strung from the trees around your outdoor circle.  These create a mystical atmosphere for any outdoor ritual, but especially spring and summer festivals like Beltane and Litha.

Mirror

Use a mirror to reflect moonlight while making moon water.  Place mirrors on the altar during beauty rituals or leave one on you permanent altar to remind yourself to look within for your personal power.

Pennies or Dollar Bills

Use these as an offering to support a spell.  Donate them to a leave a penny/take a penny or toss them in a fountain.

Pins and Needles

I personally don’t use voodoo dolls or poppets to cause harm.  I know this is part of some traditions, but it’s not for me.  However, you can use the same principle for healing poppets, but instead of focusing on harmful thoughts, think of them as acupuncture pins to sooth pain and correct imbalances.

Potted Plants

Place them on the altar or in the northern corner of your sacred circle to symbolize the Element of Earth.

Seasonal Decor

Use seasonal decorations to decorate your altar for the Sabbats.  Christmas decorations work for a Yule altar, Halloween decor for Samhain, Easter decorations for Ostara, ect.

Sea Shells

Got a little collection of sea shells from your last trip to the beach?  Bust those babies out.  Use them on the altar or in the western corner of your sacred circle to symbolize the Element of Water or try incorporating them into sea witchcraft.

Soap

You know that fancy stuff you got for your birthday or at the office Christmas party that smells to good to use?  “Spend” it on a luxurious ritual bath for the full moon.

Vases

You know that cluster of vases from old bouquets and floral arrangements that you don’t know what to do with?  Put one on the altar and keep something fresh all the time, preferably something you collected on your magical nature walks.  Keeping this up helps connect your indoor altar (and you!) to the natural world around you.

Wind Chimes

Hang them around your outdoor sacred space to welcome spirits, dispel negative energy and symbolize the Element of Air.

Wine Glass

Of course, I love to have a beautiful pewter chalice to pass around for cakes and ale, but any wine glass will do.  Use it on the altar to float candles in water, fill it with ritual wine or put spring water in it to symbol the Element of Water in your ritual space.

 

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7 Comments

  1. This is a great list. Your suggestion of instead of a voodoo doll using it as acupuncture was brilliant!

  2. I was glad that you suggest to use voodoo dolls for healing I’m not comfortable to cause harm to others 😍 , i’m Only a beginner looking at all aspects ect and spells and herbs ect . Having said only at the start of my learning curve 😊 I’ve been researching for last 2 years being on my own so no covern , any insight would be gratefully received . My main concern is that I don’t invite any unwelcome enterties into my home through my lack of knowledge on cleansing before rituals .
    Any pearls of wisdom would be gratefully received xxx

    1. Personally, I think voodoo and hoodoo get a negative reputation that is unfair. Much of this bases itself in historical issues, like missionaries who wanted to squash indigenous traditions of American slaves.

      Modern witchcraft, unfortunately, has been lumped into the same category. I don’t think you are any more likely to invite negative energy into your home with witchcraft than you would any other religion, including Christianity (after all, Catholics perform exorcisms, so it’s not like that *never* happens to them.)

      Witchcraft requires you to be responsible for what you put into the world. If you send out love and light, you’ll get back love and light.

      Spell casting has consequences just like any other proactive action. But so does having a baby or getting a new job. Life has consequences. I see witchcraft as no more dangerous than getting married or buying a new car. You may or may not regret it. Knowing this makes you much more careful about what you wish for.

      You can read more about this here:

      https://moodymoons.com/2015/11/10/dark-witch-working-in-the-shadows/

    1. Try not to be put off by what you’ve heard about voodoo. It’s actually a rich, fascinating tradition descended from West and Central Africa that migrated through the slave trade to Southern part of the United States. Our culture has invested a lot in demonizing voodoo practitioners (most people, for example, are familiar with the highly misunderstood “voodoo doll”) but they have a lot in common with neopagans.

      I encourage you to take a trip to New Orleans and meet with some of the voodoo practitioners there. You’ll be surprised to discover among them many expert midwives, healers and deeply knowledgeable historians on the subject of African American spirituality.

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